Almost a million hits!

It’s been a while since I wrote any new recipes – I do refer to this site all the time and I love to see the comments. I wanted to acknowledge the visitors to the site – 858,714 hits! That is a LOT! I wanted to thank the patrons who come by regularly and also those who stumble upon this as they are looking for very specific North Karnataka recipes. We are almost ready to publish a coffee table book with all these unique recipes. Stay tuned on that. How awesome will it be to flaunt a book that talks about your culture and recipes from your region?! Let me know if you would be interested in the comments section.

Hirekai Palle

Hirekai is called Ridge Gourd in English and Dhodka-Gosavale in Marathi. In Hindi it is called Turai. This vegetable is cooked by peeling the cover. The cover can be used to make Hirekai chutney which we have outlined the recipe for in this blog. Try a little bit of ghee on the recipe below – will be amazingly tasty!

Here goes the recipe.

Ingredients:
Hirekai – 250 g, onion-100g, green chili paste or red chili powder (depending on what you use, the garnishing changes in the end), coriander powder, salt, jaggery, cumin powder,  vegetable oil, cumin seeds, mustard seeds, asafetida, coriander/cilantro, peanut powder and gural powder, fresh grated coconut

Process:

  • Cut herekai into big square pieces.
  • Cut onion into similar pieces.
  • Chop coriander finely.
  • Heat oil in a pan having cover.
  • Add cumin, mustard seeds and asafetida (hingu).
  • After the mustard seeds crackle, add chopped onion, turmeric powder, asafetida and allow to cook.
  • Now add green chili paste or red chili powder, coriander and cumin powder and then add herekai  pieces, salt and little jaggery.
  • Allow to cook by covering the vessel and putting little water on the lid. As the vegetable gets cooked, the water on top gets hot. Transfer the water to the vegetable and allow to cook for 5 minutes.
  • Add peanut powder and gural powder, mix well and cook for 2 more minutes.
  • Before serving sprinkle chopped coriander leaves on top if red chili powder is used in the recipe; sprinkle fresh grated coconut and chopped coriander if green chili paste is used in the recipe.

Typically Served With:
Serve with ground chapatis or rotis.

Thondi Kayi Palle

This is also called Tondli in Marathi. In English, it is called ivy gourd, also known as baby watermelon, little gourd or gentleman’s toes. It is called a poor man’s vegetable in some parts of the country. I have always loved the taste of this palle – the way my mom cooks it :).

There are several ways to cook this. Here are two ways..

Method 1:

Ingredients:
Tondli- 250 g, onion – 100g, green chili paste, salt, jaggery, cumin powder,  vegetable oil, cumin seeds, mustard seeds, asafetida – a pinch of it, fresh cut coriander leaves (cilantro), fresh grated coconut.

Process:

  • Cut the tondli as into thin round pieces ( coin shaped).
  • Cut the onion into long thin pieces.
  • Chop coriander finely.
  • Heat oil in a thick bottomed pan with lid.
  • Add cumin seeds, mustard seeds and asafetida (hingu).
  • After the mustard seeds crackle, add cut onion, green chili paste and cumin powder and allow the onion to turn brownish.
  • Now add the tondli pieces, salt  and little jaggery, mix well and close the pan with the lid and put a little water on top of the lid/cover so that the vegetable cooks on low fire. The evaporated steam from the vegetable condenses because of the water on the lid and so you can cook without adding any water in the vegetable itself.
  • The vegetable will be ready within 5-10 minutes.
  • Transfer it to a serving pot and garnish with chopped coriander and fresh grated coconut before serving.

Method 2:

Ingredients: Tondli- 250 g, onion–100g chopped, turmeric powder, red chili powder or masala khara (see recipe on this blog), coriander powder, cumin powder, salt, jaggery, vegetable oil, cumin seeds, mustard seeds, asafetida, coriander/cilantro leaves, peanut powder and gural powder.

Process:

  • Cut tondli  into long pieces.
  • Cut onion into long pieces.
  • Chop coriander finely.
  • Heat oil in a pan that has a cover.
  • Add cumin, mustard seeds and asafetida (hingu).
  • After the mustard seeds crackle, add cut onion, turmeric powder, asafetida and allow to cook.
  • Now add masala khara powder or red chili, coriander powder and cumin powder and then add tondli pieces, salt and little jaggery.
  • Allow to cook by covering the vessel and putting little water on the lid. As the vegetable gets cooked, the water on top gets hot. Transfer the water to the vegetable and allow to cook for 10 minutes.
  • Add peanut powder and gural powder, mix well and cook for 2 more minutes.
  • Sprinkle chopped coriander on top before serving.

Typically Served With:
Serve with ground chapatis or rotis.

2011 in review – need to post some more!

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog. One of the items we are working on is creating a coffee table book with the recipes. Stay tuned!

Here’s an excerpt:

The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 97,000 times in 2011. If it were an exhibit at the Louvre Museum, it would take about 4 days for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Bisibelebhaat

Bishi bele bhaat – is a rice dish with rice, daal and LOTs of vegetables! When you have it with ghee and a papad on the side – it is amazingly tasty! I love the way Leela attewaree makes this! Too tasty!!

Ingredients:
1 cup turdal, 2 cups rice, 1 tea spoon cumin powder, 2 tea spoons coriander powder, vegetables like carrots, beans, awarekai (papdi), peas etc, 2 table spoon bishibelebhat powder (any brand – MTR is usually very good), mustard, cumin seeds, asaphoetida, turmeric powder, tamrind paste, jagri, salt, oil, ghee.
.
Process:

  • Cook rice extra soft with 3 times water.
  • Cook  turdal along with veg like carrot, beans,  little dry grams (hurbhara-just 1 table spoon) , green peas, avare kaayi and other vegetables of your choice in pressure cooker along with rice but is a separate vessel in the cooker.
  • Heat oil in a vessel, and season with mustard, cumin seeds and asaphotida. 
  • Add cut onion, curry leaves coriander and cumin powder and turmeric powder.
  • After 2 minutes put tamarind paste diluted in water, jaggery and salt and allow to boil.
  • Now transfer cooked dal to it.
  • Add 2 table spoons of bishibele bhat masala powder,  salt, and then the cooked rice.
  • Mix well and boil for 5 min.
  • Garnish with coriander and serve hot with ghee!

Typically Served With:

papad, pickle and curd

Tamarind Chutney (Hunsi Takku)

Hunasi takku (hunchi tak) is something that will get anybody’s taste buds going “tak!”. You can eat it with chapatis, rotis or just apply a bit to bread or who knows – some of us like me might just like to nibble on a bit to get the taste buds active!

Ingredients

1 kg Green and hard tamarind (not the tender ones or also the ripe brown ones), green chillis, cumin seeds, 200 g salt, asaphotida (hingu), mustard, turmeric powder, jaggery

Process

  • Peel the tamrind and remove the threadlike portion and the stem(end) portion.
  • Cut green chillis into big pieces.
  • Mix tamrind, chillis and salt and grind together to a coarse mixture and store in a glass jar or mud vessel(matka) which can be kept for upto an year .
  • Whenever required for serving (eating), take a small portion from this, add little jaggery and cumin seeds and grind to form a less coarse ( not paste) mixture.
  • Heat oil in a small kadai, add mustard.
  • After mustard cracks, add asaphoetida, turmeric powder and pour this seasoning on the coarse mixture.

Typically Served with:

Chapatis, Rice, Rotti, bread

Masargayi

Masar kai or Masargayi is basically dried chilly which can be fried before eating. It is typically eaten with curd rice.

Ingredients:

25 Long and spicy green chillis, 1/2 cup + 1 tea spoon cumin powder (for stuffing and curd), 1 table spoon + 1 tea spoon hingu (asaphotida powder), 2  tea spoons+ 1 tea  spoons salt, 1 tea spoon sugar, 1/2 litre sour and soft  curd or thick butter milk and oil for frying.

Process:

  • Make longitudinal slits in the chills.
  • Mix 1/2 cup cumin powder(jeera powder), 1 tea spoon hingu (asafoetida) and salt.
  • Stuff the chillis with this mixture.
  • Add 1 tea spoon salt, 1 tea spoon cumin powder, 1 tea spoon hingu powder and 1 tea spoon sugar to the curd and mix well.
  • Transfer the stuffed chillis in this curd and keep those for soaking in the curd overnight.
  • Remove the soaked chillis from the curd and dry in hot sun by spreading on plastic sheet, for 2-3 days till they are crisp and dry.
  • Store in plastic or glass container.
  • Deep fry in hot oil in kadai just before you want to eat it.

Tips and Tricks:

  • The soaked chillies could be dried in microwave oven too). 

Typically Served With:

Curd rice and other rice dishes or sweet dishes like holige, payasam etc