Sajji Rotti

Sajji rotti is another all time favorite and I had a recipe request for the same. So here goes the recipe!

Ingredients:
4 cups Sajji(Bajri) flour containing 1/2 cup udid flour, 1 table spoonwhite or black til, salt to taste.

Process:

  • Take sajji flour in a big flat bottom vessel, add salt and til (sesame seeds) to it.
  • Pour hot boiling water to make a solid dough.
  • Knead the dough thoroughly by pressing several times with palm and fingers of right hand till the dough appears sticky.
  • Take a small ball of the dough (size of ping-pong ball) and dip it in dry flour.
  • Put it on the platform (or a flat surface) and make rotis by patting softly first with one palm and then with both the palms.
  • Once it attains a certain size (approximately 3-4 cm diameter), pat and rotate it on the platform as you pat. Use dry flour on the platform to keep it from sticking.
  • Tranfer the roti on hot tawa, apply water on the upper side using a wash cloth soaked in water.
  • Turn it upside down and bake on low fire till it is crisp.
  • Keep the rotis in open flat container till they are totally dry.

Tips and Tricks:

  • These rotis can remain fresh for many days and are tasty with different dry chutneys and curd.
  • These serve as appetizer and are usually served in the begining of meals, specially heavy festival lunches.
  • When you make the rottis, you can keep two tavas. Once it gets cooked, you can transfer to the second tava that is on very very low fire so it becomes extra crunchy.

Typically Served With:
sajji rotti, jhunkad vadi, different chutneys like agashi hindi, shenga chutney, dry coconut chutney, karindi and hesar kaal..sluuuurrrrp!!!

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Raagi Rotti

Ragi roti is a variation of jowar roti. Ragi is an excellent source of iron – so ragi rotti is another healthy food recipe! The recipe is similar to jowar roti.

Ingredients:

Ragi flour, water, a pinch of salt

Process:

  • Take finely ground ragi ata (flour) 250 grams in a wide mouthed vessel with shallow depth. It can also be a large plate with long edges.
  • In a separate vessel take just little water (1/2 a cup) and bring it to boil. Add the boiling water to make a dough from the Jowar flour which is already taken in the shallow pan. This dough is called jigatu in Kannada.
  • Now take this jigatu and add dry jowar flour and knead it thoroughly with just enough water to make dough of such consistency as chapati dough (may be even less water than that).
  • To make rotti you should press/beat the circular dough with the palm of your hand on a flat surface such as the kitchen platform. Initially use the right hand to beat it in the form of a circle and use the left hand to maintain a circle (video coming soon!).
  • Dry flour may be used to avoid the dough sticking to the flat surface while preparing the rotti. This is the crucial step!!
  • Once the rotti is ready, it should be carefully transferred to a hot Tawa.
  • When the lower part of the rotti gets slightly dry apply water on the upper surface of the roti with a piece of soft cloth and allow it to remain until the water just evaporates a little.
  • Then carefully reverse the rotti and bake the other side, pressing this side while baking- if pressed gently with a cloth , the roti puffs separating into two layers with steam in side.
  • Remove it from the Tawa and serve it hot!!

 Tips and Tricks:

  • If the rotti starts crumbling (no jigatu), try to put boiling water in the entire flour to make the dough instead of using jigatu.

 Typically Served With:

subjis, chutney, khar byali.

Jolad Rotti

If I were to pick my favourite food and had to choose only one, then this would be it. My absolute number one favourite! I think I attribute it to my Amma (granny). I used to loathe naps in the afternoon and so used to stay awake when all my other brothers and sisters used to nap. After everyone’s lunch, sometimes my granny would have just a little hot rotti remaining. So she used to take the “birasu” rotti from the previous day and I’d eat a few bites with her. I think that taste has just struck a string in me. This is called bhakri in Marathi. Anyways, here goes the recipe.

Ingredients:

Jowar (Jola in Kannada) or Sorghum (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorghum) flour, water, a pinch of salt

Process:

  • Take finely ground Jowar ata (flour) 250 grams in a wide mouthed vessel with shallow depth. It can also be a large plate with long edges.
  • In a separate vessel take just little water (1/2 a cup) and bring it to boil. Add the boiling water to make a dough from the Jowar flour which is already taken in the shallow pan. This dough is called jigatu in Kannada.
  • Now take this jigatu and add dry jowar flour and knead it thoroughly with just enough water to make dough of such consistency as chapati dough (may be even less water than that).
  • To make rotti you should press/beat the circular dough with the palm of your hand on a flat surface such as the kitchen platform. Initially use the right hand to beat it in the form of a circle and use the left hand to maintain a circle (video coming soon!).
  • Dry flour may be used to avoid the dough sticking to the flat surface while preparing the rotti. This is the crucial step!!
  • Once the rotti is ready, it should be carefully transferred to a hot Tawa.
  • When the lower part of the rotti gets slightly dry apply water on the upper surface of the roti with a piece of soft cloth and allow it to remain until the water just evaporates a little.
  • Then carefully reverse the rotti and bake the other side, pressing this side while baking- if pressed gently with a cloth , the roti puffs separating into two layers with steam in side.
  • Remove it from the Tawa and serve it hot!! 

Tips and Tricks:

  • The rotis if do not get consumed may be eaten later as birasu rotti.
  • If you want to make crisp rottis like sajji rotti, then you need to make them very thin and bake on very low heat for long time (5-8 mins on low low fire). Typically you can keep two tawas, so once the rotti is cooked, you transfer it to the other tava and bake it on it for about 5-7 minutes turning 2-3 times.
  • This is a cumbersome procedure!! If one practices for a few days, this is very healthy food (no oil!)
  • If the rotti starts crumbling when you try to make it(no jigatu), try to put boiling water in the entire flour to make the dough instead of using jigatu. This applies for jowar flour got in grocery stores abroad. The flour is not fresh and so it loses the stickiness (jigatu) as it ages.
  • When you get fresh jowar flour, keep it in the refrigerator to prevent it from losing the jigatu (this holds especially for folks who get jowar flour from India :-)).

 Typically Served With:

Stuffed bell pepper, stuffed brinjal (yengai), hesar kaaLu, jhunkad vadi and any fresh salads. Some chutneys that go well are Shenga hindi (kind of peanut chutney with garlic), aradidda khara etc. Another way to eat it is with hot jhunka or pitla – called jhunka bhakri or pitla bhakri. This is a famous combination in Belgaum and Maharashtra.  

Thalipet

Thalipet is a snack that is made with different flours. I think I love anything that has a rough texture – rotti, sajji rotti, katak rotti, dry rotti, thalipet etc.

Ingredients:

With Mixed flours:

2 cups rice flour, 1 cup wheat flour, 1 cup jowar flour, 1 cup gram flour, 2 onions cut into small pieces,  7-8 green chilis finely ground, cut menthe leaves or spinach, finely chopped coriander(cilantro), tamarind water or sour curd, brown sugar (jaggery) 1 teaspoon, turmeric powder, cut curry leaves.

Process:

  • Mix all the ingredients in water and prepare a soft dough. Add tamarind water or curd to taste.
  • Make balls of moderate size.
  • Spread in the shape of a circle on buttered plastic sheet with the help of fingers.
  • Transfer the thalipet to the hot frying pan (tawa) and bake it by putting small quantity of oil all around the edges.
  • Turn upside down  apply oil as before and bake. 

 Tips and Tricks:

  • You can make a small hole at the center of the thalipet with your finger. When you put oil, you can put oil here too to make sure oil is applied to the whole thalipet.
  • You can also make thalipet out of bhajani flour.

Typically Served With:

Serve hot with butter and coconut or peanut chutney  or raita.

Phale

Phala (pronounced as phaLa as in fruit in Marathi). This was called poor man’s fruit because in the olden days poor people could not afford fruits. So the story is that they used to make this “phala” and eat those as fruits. It is too tasty and the key is that it should be steaming hot – should not be eaten even 10 minutes after cooking – eat immediately!

Ingredients:

2 cups Wheat flour,  1 cup toor dal, salt to taste, 1 tablespoon oil, 1 teaspoon masale khara, 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds, 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds, 4-6 curry leaves, coriander (cilantro), ½ lemon and jaggery.

Process:

  • Prepare dough with wheat flour adding little salt and 1 tea spoon oil (exactly like chapatti dough) and keep aside.
  • Cook tur dal in pressure cooker for 7 minutes after attaining the maximum pressure.
  • Season it in a vessel with oil, curry leaves, cumin seeds and mustard seeds.
  • Add masale khara, salt, lemon and little jaggery.
  • Add water to obtain curry (saar) consistency and boil on low fire.
  • Roll the wheat dough to make thick chapati ( 1 and 1/2 times the regular chapatti size).
  • Cut it into small rectangular pieces ( around 1″ by 1″ size).
  • Put these pieces in the boiling dal.
  • Add fresh chopped coriander (cilantro) and cook for 5 minutes.

Typically Served With:

Meals – served hot with ghee on top. 

Holige or Holagi

Holagi (yes the Dharwad kannada version of Holige) is a sweet dish and considered a delicacy and is made on festivals and special occasions. It is called Puran Poli, obattu, Poli etc.

Ingredients:

Chana daal (2 cups), jaggery (1.5 cup), cardamom powder, maida flour (1 cup), Rice flour to roll the holagis, pinch of salt, cooking oil.

Process:

To make the Hurna (filling)

  1.  Boil water and put washed chana in it.
  2. Continue to boil until the daal is soft and water is thick.
  3. Filter the water and keep aside (this water is called “Kat” and is used to make “Kattin Saar”).
  4. For each cup of chana daal, put 3/4 cup of jaggery. So here put 1.5 cups of jaggery.
  5. Boil the cooked daal and jaggery until it becomes a little thicker (hurna consistancy for those who know it 😉 and for those who don’t, it should be a paste).
  6. Put in a food processor, add cardamom powder and grind to fine paste.

To make the Holagi:

  1. Take the maida flour (2 cups of chana needs 1 cup of maida)
  2. Add some salt (0.25 tea spoon), cooking oil (1 tablespoon) and knead for a long time. The more you knead, the better the dough. Keep aside for about an hour or two.
  3. Make small balls and roll the dough in a circle.
  4. Fill the hurna, wrap the circle and seal the ends together.
  5. Roll the sealed ball using rice flour so that it won’t stick to the rolling pin or the platform. You could also roll using oil but we usually use rice flour as it is easier and less messy.
  6. Put this on a hot tava and cook it on both sides with oil.
  7. Serve with hot ghee on top.

 Tips:

  1. You can use brown sugar found in most grocery stores instead of jaggery. It is easier and tastes the same. 
  2. There should not be any channa grains when you make the hurna (stuffing). The grains make the holagi tear when you are rolling.

Served With:

Yenagai, kosambri, Mango Shrikarni. Actually Ambras-Poli is a Maharashtrian influence and accompanies holige in our area.