Hirekai Palle

Hirekai is called Ridge Gourd in English and Dhodka-Gosavale in Marathi. In Hindi it is called Turai. This vegetable is cooked by peeling the cover. The cover can be used to make Hirekai chutney which we have outlined the recipe for in this blog. Try a little bit of ghee on the recipe below – will be amazingly tasty!

Here goes the recipe.

Ingredients:
Hirekai – 250 g, onion-100g, green chili paste or red chili powder (depending on what you use, the garnishing changes in the end), coriander powder, salt, jaggery, cumin powder,  vegetable oil, cumin seeds, mustard seeds, asafetida, coriander/cilantro, peanut powder and gural powder, fresh grated coconut

Process:

  • Cut herekai into big square pieces.
  • Cut onion into similar pieces.
  • Chop coriander finely.
  • Heat oil in a pan having cover.
  • Add cumin, mustard seeds and asafetida (hingu).
  • After the mustard seeds crackle, add chopped onion, turmeric powder, asafetida and allow to cook.
  • Now add green chili paste or red chili powder, coriander and cumin powder and then add herekai  pieces, salt and little jaggery.
  • Allow to cook by covering the vessel and putting little water on the lid. As the vegetable gets cooked, the water on top gets hot. Transfer the water to the vegetable and allow to cook for 5 minutes.
  • Add peanut powder and gural powder, mix well and cook for 2 more minutes.
  • Before serving sprinkle chopped coriander leaves on top if red chili powder is used in the recipe; sprinkle fresh grated coconut and chopped coriander if green chili paste is used in the recipe.

Typically Served With:
Serve with ground chapatis or rotis.

Thondi Kayi Palle

This is also called Tondli in Marathi. In English, it is called ivy gourd, also known as baby watermelon, little gourd or gentleman’s toes. It is called a poor man’s vegetable in some parts of the country. I have always loved the taste of this palle – the way my mom cooks it :).

There are several ways to cook this. Here are two ways..

Method 1:

Ingredients:
Tondli- 250 g, onion – 100g, green chili paste, salt, jaggery, cumin powder,  vegetable oil, cumin seeds, mustard seeds, asafetida – a pinch of it, fresh cut coriander leaves (cilantro), fresh grated coconut.

Process:

  • Cut the tondli as into thin round pieces ( coin shaped).
  • Cut the onion into long thin pieces.
  • Chop coriander finely.
  • Heat oil in a thick bottomed pan with lid.
  • Add cumin seeds, mustard seeds and asafetida (hingu).
  • After the mustard seeds crackle, add cut onion, green chili paste and cumin powder and allow the onion to turn brownish.
  • Now add the tondli pieces, salt  and little jaggery, mix well and close the pan with the lid and put a little water on top of the lid/cover so that the vegetable cooks on low fire. The evaporated steam from the vegetable condenses because of the water on the lid and so you can cook without adding any water in the vegetable itself.
  • The vegetable will be ready within 5-10 minutes.
  • Transfer it to a serving pot and garnish with chopped coriander and fresh grated coconut before serving.

Method 2:

Ingredients: Tondli- 250 g, onion–100g chopped, turmeric powder, red chili powder or masala khara (see recipe on this blog), coriander powder, cumin powder, salt, jaggery, vegetable oil, cumin seeds, mustard seeds, asafetida, coriander/cilantro leaves, peanut powder and gural powder.

Process:

  • Cut tondli  into long pieces.
  • Cut onion into long pieces.
  • Chop coriander finely.
  • Heat oil in a pan that has a cover.
  • Add cumin, mustard seeds and asafetida (hingu).
  • After the mustard seeds crackle, add cut onion, turmeric powder, asafetida and allow to cook.
  • Now add masala khara powder or red chili, coriander powder and cumin powder and then add tondli pieces, salt and little jaggery.
  • Allow to cook by covering the vessel and putting little water on the lid. As the vegetable gets cooked, the water on top gets hot. Transfer the water to the vegetable and allow to cook for 10 minutes.
  • Add peanut powder and gural powder, mix well and cook for 2 more minutes.
  • Sprinkle chopped coriander on top before serving.

Typically Served With:
Serve with ground chapatis or rotis.

Bharta (Baigan Barta)

Bharta is made with grilled, mashed eggplant – badnekai. It is usually made during Sankranti. It is my brother’s favorite recipe!

Ingredients:
Baingan (badanekai) 250 gms, carrots 100gms, fresh green grams, green chillis, til, gural powder ,cumin seeds and salt.
Process:

  • Roast til and cumin seeds and powder it.
  • Also roast green chillis in oil.
  • Apply oil on the brinjal and roast on low fire.
  • Steam carrots after cutting into small pieces.
  • Mix all the ingredients and mash to coarse consistency.
  • Mix gural powder, cumin and sesame(til) powder.
  • Add salt to taste and mix well.

Typically Served With:

Chapati, rotti, Sajji rotti, katak rotti etc

Pundi palle

You really have to be a hard-core north Karnatak-ian to know this palle :). Or you might have heard the following:

Ganapati Ganapati Moraya!

Pundi palle sorya!

We do get this in NJ sometimes. It is called Bimli Jute in English. The botanical name of this is Hibiscus Cannabinus. This plant is mostly found in India and is distributed throughout the country up to an elevation of 3000 feet in the lower Himalayas. Here is what it is called in various languages:

English: Bimli Jute, Deccan Hemp, Kenaf

Sanskrit: Nalita

Hindi: Ambari, patsan, pitwa

Bengali: Mestapat

Marathi: Ambadi, Ambada

Gujarati: Ambari, sheria

Telugu: Gogu, gonkura

Tamil: Pulichhai, pulimanji, kasini

Kannada: Pundi

Malayalam: Kanjaru

Oriya: Kanuriya

Bihari: Kudrum

Punjabi: Sankokla

It is amazing to know that the plant is used to make ropes, jute bags, fishing nets, strings for tying rafters, floor mats, rug and chair backing etc. If the plant has less fibre, then it is used to manufacture paper. The leaves on the other hand are used as a herb. Tender leaves are also used as cattle fodder and seeds as cattle feed. They have a fatty oil used to make soaps, linoleum, paints and varnishes and after refining..

Here goes the recipe that is again rich in Iron!

Ingredients:
2 cups cleaned and separated Pundi (ambadi) leaves , about 1 cup coarsely broken Sorghum (jolad nuchchu) or coarsely broken rice (akke nuchchu) or thick wheat rawa, 2 bulbs pealed garlic separated into cloves, salt, 2 spoons veg oil.

Process:

  • Boil pundi leaves in 4-5 cups water till the leaves are cooked soft.
  • Decant the water.
  • Put the garlic cloves,  jolad nuchchu, salt, mix well and cook for about 20 minutes with intermittent stirring till the nuchchu is well cooked and there is homogeneous mass formed.
  • Put the oil and mix well. 

Typically Served With:
Serve with ground  (kudsid khara) made with green chilli or red chilli (ranjaka) and oil to be eaten with jolad roti

Roasted Kirkasaali (Tandulsa)

Kirkasali is another vegetable that is very specific to North Karnataka area. This is again another high iron recipe.

Ingredients:

Fresh kirkasali leaves cleaned and finely cut 2 cups, peeled, finely cut and crushed garlic cloves 5-6, 1 medium sized onion finely cut (optional), 1 or 2 longitudinally cut green chillies, oil for seasoning, cumin seeds and hing (asafoetida).

Process:

  • Heat the oil in a kadai or flat bottomed vessel. 
  • Season with cumin seeds, asafoetida and then add green chillies and the crushed cut garlic.
  • When the garlic turns brown, add the finely cut onion Keep the vessel covered for 2-3 minutes on low fire to cook the onion.
  • When the onion turns transparent, transfer the cut kirkasali leaves, add salt and mix well using a big spoon.
  • Cover the vessel and let the vegetable cook on low fire for 5 – 7 minutes.

Tips and Tricks:

  • You can add fresh grated coconut at the end. This gives a very good flavour.

Typically Served With:

Serve with jowar rotti or chapatti.

Sauteed Rajgira

Roasted or Sauteed Rajgira is another leafy vegetable that goes very well with jowar rotti. I believe it is called tambde bhaaji in konkani. I am still trying to find out what it is called in English. I have seen this in the Indian stores here in Edison, NJ. This recipe is also high in iron and anti-oxidants.

Ingredients:

Fresh rajgira leaves cleaned and finely cut – 2 cups, peeled, finely cut and crushed garlic cloves 5-6, 1 medium sized onion finely cut (optional), 1 or 2 longitudinally cut green chillies, oil for seasoning, cumin seeds and hing (asafoetida), fresh grated coconut 1/2 cup (optional)

Process:

  • Heat the oil in a kadai or flat bottomed vessel. 
  • Season with cumin seeds, asafoetida and then add green chillies and the crushed cut garlic.
  • When the garlic turns brown, add the finely cut onion Keep the vessel covered for 2-3 minutes on low fire to cook the onion.
  • When the onion turns transparent, transfer the cut rajgira leaves, add salt and mix well using a big spoon.
  • Cover the vessel and let the vegetable cook on low fire for 5 – 7 minutes.

Tips and Tricks:

  • You can add fresh grated coconut at the end. This gives a very good flavour.

Typically Served With:

Serve with jowar rotti or chapatti.

Sauteed Methy, Menthe or Fenugreek

The next few recipes are called “talasidda palle” in Kannada. This is usually done for different leafy vegetables and so it is a high source of iron. The key is to keep it simple. These are pure preparations with only oil, garlic, onion and salt. Menthe palle is really good for diabetic patients. Infact people with diabetes can drink a glass of water mixed with a spoon each of methy powder and turmeric powder in the morning. Here is the recipe for talasidda menthe:

Ingredients:

Fresh methy leaves cleaned and coarsely cut (not finely cut) 2 cups, peeled, finely cut and crushed garlic cloves 5-6, 1 medium sized onion finely cut (optional), 1 or 2 longitudinally cut green chillies, oil for seasoning, cumin seeds and hing (asafoetida).

Process:

  • Heat the oil in a kadai or flat bottomed vessel. 
  • Season with cumin seeds, asafoetida and then add green chillies and the crushed cut garlic.
  • When the garlic turns brown, add the finely cut onion Keep the vessel covered for 2-3 minutes on low fire to cook the onion.
  • When the onion turns transparent, transfer the cut methy leaves, add salt and mix well using a big spoon.
  • Cover the vessel and let the vegetable cook on low fire for 5 – 7 minutes.

Tips and Tricks:

  • You can add fresh grated coconut at the end. This gives a very good flavour.

Typically Served With:

Serve with jowar rotti or chapatti.